Wetland Grasses

The Benefits Of Restoration Plantings With Native Grasses

When restoring a natural area, it is important to select the right types of plants. Restoring and maintaining natural areas is much easier with the use of native grasses, instead of non-indigenous varieties. Native species, like Pennsylvania sedge or creek sedge, offer immediate benefits as well as longer-term advantages.

Why Native Grasses are Better than Non-Indigenous?

Native grasses developed in the region, adapting to its soil, climate, and rainfall. That is the most obvious advantage to using native species. Because they have adapted so well, the grasses can survive even through times of excessive rainfall or extreme drought.

These native species, like creek sedge, also have natural defenses against the diseases and pests that are common to the area. There is no need to worry about the grasses, like Texas sedge or Appalachian sedge, dying from a disease or pest that it has never encountered before. That is critical for long-term success in the restoration process.

These grasses develop deep root systems, which helps to stabilize the soil. The root systems and grass tops also capture organic matter, allowing it to break down and enhance the surrounding soil. The roots of wetland grasses also capture and release nutrients from water runoff.

You don't get these benefits from non-indigenous grass varieties, even those that evolved in a similar climate. For one, they don't have the natural defenses against local diseases and pests. So, the grass you plant this year may be dead next year because a certain bug loves to chew it.

Which Species to Use?

With the low cost of wholesale grasses, you can mix and match according to your climate and the project needs. So, you might use Texas sedge in one location and have wetland grasses in another. Pennsylvania sedge can go closer to the road while Appalachian sedge does better on a shady hillside.

Let our wholesale grasses make your restoration project a success.