Sun Perennials

Most Vibrant Perennials

Sun Perennials

The red cardinal flower is an herbaceous perennial that grows up to four feet tall. Its vibrant red florets are produced in long, terminal racemes. Red cardinal flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies, bringing your garden to life beginning in midsummer and continuing to bloom through early autumn. Its abundantly leafed growths thrive in moist soil such as stream banks and marshes but will produce incandescent, wing-like blooms in your garden with sufficient sun and water. The beauty of the lobelia cardinalis cannot be overstated: Its eye-catching, bold red flowers and hardy green stalks are breathtaking.

The bright and pleasing yellow daylily is a versatile and hardy perennial, able to thrive in various conditions of soil and sunlight with very little care. The showy yellow daylily's scientific name is Hemerocallis. It blooms cheerfully from late spring until autumn. The daylily is so named because each of its lovely flowers lasts only one day. However, every clump of daylily plants presents many stalks, and each of the stalks boasts many flower buds. This means that the daylily will flower in an almost kaleidoscopic fashion, changing each night over a period of several weeks.

Yellow trillium's bright yellow petals bloom against a graceful silver-green backdrop. The flowers of this stunning perennial carry a lemony fragrance as they rise upward from the center of each mottled green leaflike stem. Trillium luteum, as it is known scientifically, is a favorite woodland wildflower native to the American South. The lovely petals, sepals, and leaves of this rhizomatous herb are always found in groups of three. Yellow trillium flourishes in half-sun, half-shade, blooms in mid to late spring, and grows up to 14 inches tall and up to a foot wide.

Red trillium's single crimson flower has three curved maroon petals, nodding up to four inches above its elegant whorl of broad leaves. The reddish-brown petals wither after two or three weeks, leaving behind a berry-like fruit. Red trillium, a perennial native to North American woodlands, thrives in shady spots and will grow up to 14 inches tall and a foot wide. Its scientific name is Trillium erectum, but red trillium is known colloquially as Stinking Benjamin, due to its unpleasant odor at close range.

Sun perennials do exceptionally well when planted in areas of direct sunlight. They are vibrant and full of color plus return every year. Unlike annual plants, they are constant summer bloomers that don't ever need to be taken up for harsh winter weather.

Sun Perennials