Native Trees

Here are a Few Native Trees.

The Hornbeam Tree

The Hornbeam tree or Carpinus Caroliniana is commonly known as the Ironwood, Blue Beech or Musclewood tree. It is a hardwood tree boasting a stunning bluish-gray bark that is on an extremely strong trunk with muscle-like ridges. In early spring, this graceful tree blooms (at the end of the branches) with both white and yellowish-green flowers. The white, female flowers give way to long hanging fruit clusters. The delicate 3-inch leaves of the Hornbeam tree turn from a deep green to yellow, orange and red hues in the fall. These trees are rather hardy; they are pest, disease and even smog resistant. Due to their unique root system, they are also very tolerant of high winds and harsh winter elements. The Hornbeam is a favorite among butterflies, songbirds, and squirrels. Deer and beavers have been known to enjoy browsing on the leaves and twigs as well. These trees are found growing beneath larger trees in their native setting which makes them a perfect choice for privacy screens and property borders. In a backyard landscape, they great for avid bird watchers and the Hornbeam tree is a favorite for lining sidewalks and streetscapes.

Butternut Tree

This tree provides colorful leaves, shade, and nuts. This native North-Eastern American tree is an attractive addition to residential or commercial landscapes. Its lush green foliage turns to a golden-yellow in autumn and blooms in the spring. It has a nice rounded, canopy shape that produces plenty of shade. Deciding where to plant this tree is easy because butternuts will grow well in both direct sunlight and shaded areas. This nut tree can also survive extremely low temperatures. A mature butternut tree can reach a height of 40 to 60 feet and can spread up to 50 feet. Butternut trees are known to easily adapt to almost any type of soil. They will grow in stony soil and have also survived in the poor quality soil.

The Norway Spruce Tree

The Norway Spruce tree is the fastest growing of all the spruces and can reach a height range of in between 40 to 60 feet. It is not unusual to hear of Norway Spruce trees in their natural setting that has reached 100 to 150 feet in height. This popular tree is a native of Europe and is known as the Mountain Spruce tree there. This regal giant features strong, upright branches one-inch dark-green needles. On the mature trees, the foliage drapes down off of the large branches. The deep brown cones of the Norway Spruce appear on the end of the branches and have a size range of 4 to 6 inches long. These are one of the most adaptable and hardy of the spruce species being both disease resistant and drought tolerant. Due to the deep spreading root system, this tree can withstand high winds, heavy snow, and thick ice. The Norway Spruce is also a valuable asset to the wildlife as it provides shelter for small mammals, game, and deer. It also is a favorite nesting site for owl and birds of prey. The Norway Spruce is the ideal tree to use for wind breaking, privacy, and shade but it does require a large landscape for the roots to expand and take hold.