Ground Covers

Vines Enhance Fences, Trellises  and make excellent climbers

Vines and Climbing Vines
 
Vines - A term used to describe plants that grow through stems that extend outward, sometimes climbing along surfaces like trees and homes. While their stems are also known as vines, common usage has left the term almost always referring to grapevines. "Climber" is commonly used for any plant with wall-scaling vines.Vines are known for the ability to climb various vertical surfaces, including poles, strings, lattices, and walls. Vines typically produce a woody stem as they mature, giving them strength to climb higher and spread wider. Their branches of leaves and flowers give extra coverage as they spread farther on surfaces.
 

Home gardeners who want to add greenery to a trellis or front porch should consider adding climbing vines to their yard. These plants are beautiful, easy to grow and some are aromatic. Here are some examples of climbing vines that work well in any landscape setting

Bishop's Weed: Bishops weed, also known as snow on the mountain is a super hardy variegated ground cover. Its delicate bright green foliage with a white trim makes it a unique feature in a garden. They are high spreaders and cover unsightly areas in landscaping or where you can not keep mowed and maintained well. They hide ground debris and weeds.

Image result for landscaping with ground covers

English Ivy: Home gardeners who like small foliage that is well-behaved should consider English ivy. This vine is perfect for hanging baskets, containers or as a ground cover. English ivy is also a good choice for climbing on trellis, porches and other structures.

Garden Phlox: Garden phlox is a beautiful lavender ground cover that turns a pinkish color in low alkalinity soils in late summer. It's versatile and makes a carpet-like appearance full of delicate blooms covering the entire plant. Perfect for planting on hills or near rocks to gently climb and bloom all summer long.

Trumpet Vines is another great hardy one that can be trained to climb primarily because they tend to grow towards the sun. When preparing your vines to climb fences or a trellis, interweave the new shoots through the openings as they grow. If you are training vines to twine around masonry or trees, you can attach a wire to the structure at the base for the vine to climb. Taking just a little time to train your vines will bring big rewards. Your fence or other arrangements will have good coverage as these plants grow upwards.