Fall Trees

Fall Trees

Trees can be by far the longest-lived elements in your garden. Some can live for hundreds of years if they’re well cared for and can be passed down through the generations along with the house. They're planted for their shade and their beauty, whether it’s because they burst into colors of red or blazing yellow in the fall, have beautiful flowers in the spring or have a pleasing habit.

Before a person buys a tree, he or she should look around their area and see what sorts of a tree grow well. If it’s possible, the homeowner should visit a botanical garden or a park where trees often have labels. The homeowner should then make a list of the types of tree that caught their fancy and then whittle down the list to those that will do well in the type of soil and light conditions of the property. The homeowner should also eliminate those trees, pretty though they may be, that aren't pest or disease resistant.

Another thing the homeowner must keep in mind is how tall and wide the tree will be when it’s mature. Knowing this will help the homeowner avoid planting the tree so close to the house that it will overwhelm the house with shade, outgrow its space or shade out a garden full of sun-loving plants.

The homeowner should also pay attention to the tree's shape, which can be round, vase-shaped or conical.

After the tree is chosen, it will need to be sited and planted. If a tree has been bought for shade, it should be planted in the south or west of the house and a good distance from it. The homeowner should also be careful not to plant the tree near utility lines or cables, whether they're overhead or underground.

Fall Trees