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Fiddlehead Fern

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$11.99
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Fiddlehead Fern - Matteuccia Struthiopteris Hardy Planting Zones- 3-9 Sun or Shade – Light to Full Shade Mature Height - 36-72" Mature Width- 60-96" Bloom Season – Not a flowering plant Gardener Status- Beginner

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Fiddlehead Fern

Fiddlehead Fern--Matteuccia Struthiopteris. Also called ostrich fern, or shuttlecock fern, the fiddlehead fern is known for the coiled green shoots that emerge from the soil, called fiddleheads. The fiddleheads themselves are only around for a few weeks, but when they poke their curved green heads out of the ground, you can be sure spring is on the way. The fiddlehead's distinctive spiral shape is the frond or leaf; all rolled up. The newly emergent fiddlehead is edible, a gourmet delicacy enjoyed by many people. Hardy in Zones 3-7, fiddlehead ferns need light to partial shade, but they can tolerate full shade. They can even tolerate full sun if the soil is kept moist. Mulching ferns can help hold in moisture. Soil for these beautiful ferns can be average to humus-rich. Spreading quickly, these ornamental beauties work well in shaded borders. Their feathery leaves can reach up to more than five feet in length. In the wild, they are often found along woodland streams, so any shady, moist area can be easily enhanced with these gorgeous ferns. Fiddlehead ferns are non-flowering and spread through underground runners, called rhizomes, and dividing them for propagation is easy.

Fiddlehead ferns, also known as ostrich ferns, have a delicious secret. For a short time in the spring, as the fronds poke through the earth, tightly curled at the tip, they are edible. These curls are called a crozier after the curved end of a staff that the bishop carries. You may have noticed them for sale in specialty grocers at a very high price. The taste is a little nutty, slightly bitter, and resembles asparagus. Sautéed in butter with a bit of garlic, they are fabulous. They are an excellent source of antioxidants, with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, they are also immensely in iron and fiber. Best to be harvested in the spring. The rest of the year, these ferns are even more fabulous in your shade garden. If planted in front of a wall or tall hedge, they will be stately and impressive. The graceful, feathery ferns make a marvelous backdrop for flowering plants and show them off. Bleeding hearts and host lilies planted in front of the ferns will be extraordinary.

 

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Fiddlehead FernFiddlehead fern - Matteuccia struthiopteris. This type of fern has a tightly coiled tip that is called a fiddlehead, which can be eaten after being cooked. The more commonly used name for this fern is the ostrich fern, and it is found in temperate climates in North America, central and Northern Europe, and northern Asia. This fern favors riverbanks and sandbars, and its colonies are extremely resistant to flooding due to their vertical crowns but wide laterally reaching stolons. The fronds resemble ostrich plumes, as could be expected from the name. The sterile fronds are green and can grow from 39-67 inches tall and 8-14 inches wide. The fertile fronds are a bit shorter in height at 16-24 inches tall, and they are brown when ripe. They begin to grow during the fall, stand tall during the winter, and produce the fiddleheads in the spring. This plant can be used both for ornamental and culinary purposes. When choosing where to plant, it is important to keep in mind that the plant can grow quite large and if it is not protected from extreme elements in the summer, the leaves can wither into a much less aesthetically pleasing form.
Fiddlehead ferns, also known as ostrich ferns, have a delicious secret. For a short time in the spring, as the fronds poke through the earth, tightly curled at the tip, they are edible. These curls are called a crozier after the curved end of a staff that the bishop carries. You may have noticed them for sale in specialty grocers at a very high price. The taste is a little nutty, slightly bitter, and resembles asparagus. Sautéed in butter with a bit of garlic, they are fabulous. They are a great source of antioxidants, with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, they are also immensely in iron and fiber. Best to be harvested in the spring. The rest of the year, these ferns are even more fabulous in your shade garden. If planted in front of a wall or tall hedge, they will be stately and impressive. The graceful, feathery ferns make a marvelous backdrop for flowering plants and show them off. Bleeding hearts and host lilies planted in front of the ferns will be extraordinary.

Fiddlehead Fern